Brian James Polak

Brian James Polak

Brian is originally from New Hampshire and he has a tattoo to prove it. Some of his plays have been published in Smith & Kraus anthologies, and his embarrassing childhood poetry has been published in Mortified: Love is a Battlefield. He is a member of The Playwrights Union and received his MFA from the USC School of Dramatic Arts. Go to brianjamespolak.com to learn more about his work. Follow him on Twitter @bejaypea.

The Subtext. Episode 18: D.G. Watson

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A podcast where playwrights talk to playwrights about the things usually left unsaid. In a conversation that dives into life’s muck, we learn what irks, agitates, motivates, inspires and — ultimately — what makes writers tick. 


In this episode, things get personal when Brian and Daryl talk about finding faith, losing faith, and perhaps finding it again. Daryl tells the story about his decision to walk across the United States, and what happened three days into his journey. Finally, despite their best wishes, they talk about the election.



D.G. WATSON
d-g-watson-bio-photo is a playwright and graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. His plays include UNBOUND (IAMA Theatre Company), THE BLUEBERRY HILL ACCORD (Stella Adler Studios), SNAP (2005 NYC Battle of the Bards Winner), PRIME TIME (Real TheatreWorks and PSNBC, Abingdon Theater), and the collaborative piece GAME ON (Actors Theatre of Louisville). D.G. was a co-creator and writer for the Emmy-nominated Disney series “Johnny and the Sprites.” His short-lived peace walk across the United States was featured on an episode of NPR’s This American Life.


Reach The Subtext at thesubtextpodcast@gmail.com, or on Twitter @SubtextPodcast.

Shakesqueer – A Queer, Feminist Reading

“We know from his plays that he struggled intimately with the social conditions that produce identity in the first place. A queer reading of Shakespeare dwells not on the orientation of the man but rather of the works. And Shakespeare’s works are queer AF.”

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